Termination Clause In License Agreement

Museum as a licensee: Make sure that the owner of the content has all the necessary rights for the content to be granted to you and that there are no restrictions on these rights. Formulations such as „to the best knowledge of the licensor“ are not acceptable. If the licensor cannot guarantee that they can give you a license, look for a licensor to do so. Guarantees are promises made by one party of the other in the agreement. For example, the licensor may guarantee that in providing the content, it has not infringed the intellectual property rights or other rights of a third party. The licensor may also guarantee that it is entitled to enter into the contract and to grant content that is not contrary to other licenses received by the owner of the content. If any of the warranties are false, the licensor providing the warranty may be subject to certain „penalties“ or indemnities, as described below. Museum as a licensee: Make sure that all access restrictions allow for appropriate use of the content by your museum and possibly by the public, and consider any off-site access you may need in your license. If automatic renewal is not included in the license, a licensee may request the content owner to notify the licensee a few weeks before the end of the license, so that it can be renewed. While a content owner may object to inclusion in a license, it is in their best interest to take on this task in order to ensure the continuation of the license. Some content owners object to sending such notifications when they have many licenses with different licensees, as this can represent an increased administrative burden for them. The patent owner and the licensee do not wish to be bound by the agreement if it is not advantageous to any of them.

If the term of the license agreement is five years, but one party does not work, the other party wishes to be able to leave the agreement. . . .